Related Science articles people might be interested to read

Welcome to The Fast Diet The official Fast forums Body Science of intermittent fasting
Related Science articles people might be interested to read

This topic contains 991 replies, has 70 voices, and was last updated by  Cinque 1 year, 9 months ago.

Viewing 50 posts - 951 through 1,000 (of 1,018 total)

  • Cinque. As you say, interesting. I knew that my bugs liked a variety of veg and that leafy greens were good, but the reason why is always useful. Popeye was ahead of the game.

    The link below leads to an interview with Alison Gannett, former professional championship high jump skier who, at a time she regarded being at peak fitness and health was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Alison gently and carefully explains the significance of pairing the practice of both Intermittent Fasting and Keto together had on the eradication of her disease state and generation of state of health even more optimal than anything she experienced prior to diagnosis.

    Given that we all breed cancer cells, this is a ‘must listen’ for everybody.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=635iP8Vgam4&t=40s

    Scientists explore which components of prebiotic fibers are most effective

    https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(19)30899-2

    Great study in Cell this week looking at which prebiotic fibers most influence the growth of specific Bacteroides species. The group from Washington University School of Medicine used germ-free mice that were colonized with 15 strains of beneficial bacteria then identified bioactive components that were present in a variety of prebiotic fibers in their diet. So get ready to eat your pea fiber, citrus pectin, resistant maltodextrin and beta-glucan barley to increase your Bacteroides counts.

    There is also a good writeup in Health News if you can’t/don’t want to deal with the hard-core sciencey stuff.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326402.php

    This is an area that is increasingly being researched, which can only be good. I loved “in this era of precision medicine”, if only that were universally so. Thanks Cinque, your links are always interesting.

    Thanks Penguin 🙂 I was thinking that you might enjoy this one as I was posting it.

    I also favour the question “who funded this research?’

    This article from the New York Times explains why eating such large quantities of fat healed my cravings and need to binge eat.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/well/eat/are-you-a-carboholic-why-cutting-carbs-is-so-tough.html

    Thank you for the New York Times article, Minka. Excellent article!

    Interesting Minka. I have no problem with fat. I cook and most cooks believe that flavinoids, and therefore the interesting tastes, are soluble in fat but not water. So I eat my share. But I try for a mostly veg diet. (says he who has just demolished a fruit cake made by OH. ) I entirely understand the issue of having a little then needing more. That pretty much describes my whisky consumption – none or several.

    Exercise before breakfast burnt more fat, and improved insulin response, compared to same exercise after breakfast:

    https://www.goodfood.com.au/good-health/new-research-reveals-the-best-time-to-exercise-to-burn-more-fat-20191020-h1j09p

    I am happy to read that. For years people have been telling me that I should eat breakfast before running or going to the gym. I also continue to go to the gym when totally fasting (zero intake) for two or three days. It is good to find some support for my view that this is OK!

    More green space and fewer fast food outlets associated with lower levels of obesity

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0002934319307478

    Poor sleep can negatively affect your gut microbiome, suggests new study. The strong gut-brain bidirectional communication may explain why not getting proper sleep can lead to short term (stress, psychosocial issues) and long-term (cardiovascular disease, cancer) health problems.

    https://news.nova.edu/news-releases/new-study-points-to-possible-correlation-between-sleep-and-overall-good-health/

    Penguin, (and Onel) I saw a post from a local radio program about medicine, linking the article Onel posted here about assessing research and flagging that they would discuss it with the author of the article. They listed the 5 steps and so I added your contribution: 6. Who funded the research?

    So during the interview they did a call out to me, thanking me for my contribution and asking for comment. The article author said that if he had a number 6, that would be it.

    So I am passing along that praise as you deserve it.

    Healthy diet means a healthy planet, study shows

    Healthier food choices almost always benefit environment as well, according to analysis

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/28/healthy-diet-means-a-healthy-planet-study-shows?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

    Cinque, Thanks for that – tardy response from me because I am 1500 miles away from home and I have to go searching for wifi.

    This is an older study, forgive me if it was already posted but it’s what has inspired my switch to 5:2 and I’d like to see more research on it. This study examined the effects of dietary restriction on rats and wound healing and effects of intermittent fasting pre operativly. The outcomes of wound healing were significantly improved in the IF rats. I’m undergoing surgery next week. We’ll see! Anyone else have experience with improved outcomes of surgery healing after intermittent fasting for a time?

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5722208/#!po=64.2857

    Lindsosa. I first encountered 5:2 in one of my wife’s magazines. As a bloke I immediately dismissed it as the latest girly fad. At the time my daughter had breast cancer (now fine) so I was researching that and found that 5:2 was being advocated as both a preventative and aid to recovery. I started 5:2, lost a lot of weight and when I subsequently had colon cancer myself I sailed through the surgery and am also fine. I know I am a small sample and I am a lot bigger that a rat, but it works for me!

    Good luck next week. (My mate , who is a surgeon, would object to that – he says that his skill is more important than luck.)

    I’ve been discussing sources of plant fibre with AntonioMS on a different thread. When discussing psyllium Antonio linked this article: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1370123/High-fibre-supplement-linked-to-cancer-risk.html
    I found another article on the same 3 year study: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/968808.stm (In these articles they refer to ispaghula husk – ispaghula and psyllium are the same thing.)
    For me it’s a caution about relying on daily doses of psyllium rather than actually developing a high fibre diet that incorporates a wide range of fibres and doesn’t require a supplement.

    I am a bit surprised that I have never heard of this before as these articles are 19 years old. That got me searching for something more recent about the links between fibre and bowel cancer. I found this 2014 article interesting as it looks back over the history of research in this field: https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/Dietary_fiber_and_colon_cancer_The_pendulum_swings_again

    In particular I noticed the division of fibre into 6 categories – I thought there were only 3 . Of interest is psyllium – which has it’s own category and is a type of fibre which it appears cannot be obtained naturally from eating a varied range of plant based foods. I have also noticed how many of the fibre categories list beans as a source. Not that I needed convincing about the merit of legumes in our diet.

    The research also seems to be clear that fibre alone is not the solution – there are links between obesity and a lack of daily exercise to colon cancer rates in some of the research.
    There is also a mention in the article of the possible positive benefits of vitamin D, calcium and asprin in reducing colon cancer rates.

    LJoyce, that is so interesting (and a bit sad since I just started taking psyllium husks regularly). I couldn’t read the article linked, because I am not subscribed, but I found this article about the study: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1370123/High-fibre-supplement-linked-to-cancer-risk.html
    I wonder if the granular form or the dosage had an effect.

    ‘More than just a clever word smash of hunger and anger, “hanger is a biological state that is precipitated by the lack of food, and that involves feeling grumpy, agitated and impatient,” explains Zane Andrews, associate professor of physiology with Monash University.’

    https://www.abc.net.au/life/why-hangry-people-are-less-in-control-of-their-emotions/11570518?sf223213136=1

    Exercise advice on food labels could help to tackle the obesity crisis

    Saying how far consumers need to walk to burn off the calories could change eating habits

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/dec/10/exercise-advice-on-food-labels-could-help-to-tackle-the-obesity-crisis

    Interesting article!

    For the bullet proof coffee crowd – ketone drinks may help control blood sugar levels
    https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/ubc-study-says-ketone-drinks-may-help-control-blood-sugar

    There was a 29% reduction in the total amount of sugar sold in soft drinks in the UK between 2015 and 2018, despite an increase in sales of soft drinks by volume of 7%. The research shows that individual soft drink companies in the UK are making a sizeable contribution to sugar reduction

    https://www.ndph.ox.ac.uk/news/amount-of-sugar-sold-in-soft-drinks-drops-by-29-in-the-uk

    Life extension benefits from lower calorie consumption might actually be from the metabolic switching caused by intermittent fasting.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=intermittent+fasting+new+england+journal+of+medicine+

    Also here is an article: https://www.insider.com/intermittent-fasting-slows-aging-cancer-diabetes-heart-disease-study-2019-12

    Rule number 1 of posting. If you knock it together without thought, it gets posted. If you craft it carefully it gets lost. Here we go again:

    Cinque. To go back a couple of posts to your “how do you tell if you are dehydrated?”. Take a blood test. On Friday I had a routine test. The friendly and efficient vampire who takes my blood two or three times a year had to stick me three times before she got any. The test was at 10am and two mugs of tea and one of coffee had not brought my fluid levels up. Apparently their diuretic properties may even have reduced them.

    I saw that there is less sugar in many canned drinks in this country. I am actually more worried about the zero sugar drinks consumed by the younger members of the family. There is increasing evidence that the artificial sweeteners, although themselves not harmful, deceive the body into expecting sugar and releasing insulin when there is no sugar to process. If this happens too often the body can become permanently confused.

    Dydask. Interesting. We seem to have been ahead of the game when we started intermittent fasting. There are new papers, articles and TV shows about the value of this approach almost daily. Unfortunately it has not led to a lessoning of the new weird diets that are also on offer, or to the number of people who tell me that intermittent fasting must be unhealthy and I should eat breakfast because “it is the most important meal of the day”. That piece of breakfast cereal marketing seems to have embedded itself in the national brain.

    This is the youtube video I was thinking about:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thgVz3837l0

    #WellnessForLife #MasterHealth #DrEkberg
    Amazing New Study Reveals Miracle Benefits Of Fasting

    Penguin in Japan there are some drinks that are only sweetened with glucose. Not zero calorie but better than the HFCS that is commonly used in the USA. (Ironically the process to produce was invented by Japanese.) I don’t know how it compares to the UK though for sugar in drinks. There are a lot of sweetened drinks for sale, but also lots of unsweetened and diet drinks.

    Dykask. Interesting YouTube. After a few years of 5:2, limited time frame eating and the occasional zero calorie fast I didn’t need convincing, but it was presented well. The only thing I would have liked to see added is the need to care for the gut biome.

    I cannot claim to be an expert on sweetened drinks. Being British and old, they just were not around when I was a kid so I never got into the habit. I don’t use sugar in tea or coffee so I find most canned drinks unpleasant no matter what they are sweetened with. What worries me is the unquestioning belief that the artificial sweeteners are healthier.

    Not sure if this has been covered here or not:

    https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2018/08/20/Low-and-high-carbohydrate-diets-cut-life-expectancy-study-finds#

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpub/article/PIIS2468-2667(18)30135-X/fulltext

    Also interesting but bit dated talk on this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0-Jt7az-54

    Upshot from first talk on the video: High fat / low carb diets are good for losing weight but poor for long term health. High protein diets are good for reproduction but lead to shorter lifespans. Higher Carb, lower protein diets make you chubby but also give the longest lifespans.

    Article from Australian consumer advocacy group Choice.

    Food additives to avoid
    More than 300 food additives are approved for use in Australia. Just how safe are they?

    https://www.choice.com.au/food-and-drink/food-warnings-and-safety/food-additives/articles/food-additives-you-should-avoid

    @cinque a very interesting article. Much better written that most of these types of articles. I learned a lot from reading it. Thanks!

    That pretty much confirms my belief that if I haven’t made it from scratch I shouldn’t be eating it. I make exceptions for a couple of pubs and restaurants where I trust the kitchen. My home problem areas are the use of soy sauce, chorizo and bacon, all of which are much down from my former consumption. I make my own bread, originally to get something with flavour but now to control what is in it. There I cheat, I make a batch about once a week, let it cool, slice it and freeze it.

    Good point Penguin. Hooray for made from scratch food. (But I’m very happy to have natural MSG from good fermented soy sauce and Parmesan!)

    I agree Dysark, Choice have done a good job of using plain English and writing clearly.

    They were talking on the radio (Australia) about how it used be advice that sportspeople shouldn’t drink water while training etc. I think that was the general sense when I was growing up, that water would sit in your stomach and slow you down, and you had to be strong and push through without it. No wonder I got chronically dehydrated too.

    Until a few years ago I ran a lot and the need to stay hydrated was known. Then we lost a few marathon runners who had taken on too much water whilst running. There was much debate at the time about what was the correct amount. I don’t think they ever worked that out, although the general consensus was that too little was the more dangerous

    We humans do tend to go from one extreme to another! (She says, still trying to work out the right amount for herself).

    That is the problem. I find it easy not to drink. I find it difficult to stop at one.

    The Sleep-Diet Connection

    Women with worse sleep quality consumed more of the added sugars associated with obesity and diabetes.
    Women who took longer to fall asleep ate more calories and food by weight.
    Women with severe insomnia ate more food and fewer ‘healthy’ fats.

    https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/skinny-why-poor-sleep-may-increase-heart-disease-women

    This article says it’s the largest study on fasting that has ever been done in the world:

    The largest scientific study on the effects of Buchinger therapeutic fasting carried out to date has now been published. It was conducted at Buchinger Wilhelmi, a well-established fasting clinic, by a team led by Dr. Françoise Wilhelmi de Toledo in cooperation with Prof. Andreas Michalsen from Charité University Hospital in Berlin and with the support of many of our guests and patients. The study collected and evaluated data from 1,422 subjects (41 % male, 59 % female), who completed the Buchinger Wilhelmi fasting programme over a period of 5, 10, 15 or 20 days in 2016. Under the title “Safety, health improvement and well-being during a 4 to 21-day fasting period in an observational study including 1422 subjects”, the study shows that Buchinger therapeutic fasting is safe and therapeutically effective. It also promotes emotional and physical well-being. The results of the study were published online on January 2, 2019 in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE.

    The study provided detailed evidence that:

    – Fasting mobilizes the energy stored in the fatty tissue of the human body. The metabolism switches from glucose to fat and ketone consumption, causing many beneficial effects. The metabolic change was documented in the study by the permanent presence of ketone bodies in the urine.
    – Fasting leads to significant weight loss, a reduced abdominal circumference, and lower cholesterol and blood lipid levels.
    – Fasting also normalized blood pressure and improved diabetes parameters such as blood sugar and HbA1c, thus improving many factors that contribute to a healthy cardiovascular system.
    – Furthermore, in 84 % of cases, serious health conditions such as arthritis, type 2 diabetes as well as fatty liver and hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure and fatigue improved through fasting.
    – 93 % of the subjects did not feel hungry during fasting, which contributed to their emotional and physical well-being.
    – Medically supervised fasting had only very few side-effects, which could be treated easily and without interruptions to fasting. In individual cases, subjects experienced restless sleep, headaches, tiredness or lumbar spine complaints during the first three days.

    In summary, this particular fasting programme has been shown to be a safe and well-tolerated approach to prevent age-related illnesses and treat chronic metabolic disorders, including weight issues. The Buchinger Wilhelmi fasting programme evolved from the traditional Buchinger fasting cure. It involves a daily intake of organic fruit juice and soup averaging 200-250 calories, accompanied by physical activity in an environment that promotes calmness and mindfulness. It combines fasting with integrative medicine and a variety of incentives for personal development and empowerment.

    Françoise Wilhelmi de Toledo, Franziska Grundler, Audrey Bergouignan, Stefan Drinda, Andreas Michalsen: “Safety, health improvement and well-being during a 4 to 21-day fasting period in an observational study including 1422 subjects.” PLOS ONE, January 2, 2019

    https://www.buchinger-wilhelmi.com/en/worlds-largest-fasting-study/

    Good to have scientific confirmation that our beliefs and way of life are valid.

    The FODMAP diet is everywhere, but researchers warn it’s not for weight loss

    https://theconversation.com/the-fodmap-diet-is-everywhere-but-researchers-warn-its-not-for-weight-loss-131550

    Differences in male and female immune systems may have a direct link to men’s propensity to develop obesity, heart disease, stroke and diabetes and women to suffer more from certain autoimmune diseases such as arthritis.

    https://www.barossaherald.com.au/story/6651448/research-links-chance-of-disease-to-gender/

    Might be interesting as well:

    Another study on the effects of fasting on the FLI(Fatty Liver Index) in summary:

    The pathological accumulation of fat in the liver and is a major cause of a worldwide increase in chronic liver disease and can lead to cirrhosis. Periodic fasting over 8.5 days on average lowers the fatty liver index (FLI), a risk parameter for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A fatty liver significantly promotes the development of type 2 diabetes and is exacerbated by overeating and lack of exercise.
    A study entitled “Effects of Periodic Fasting on Fatty Liver Index – A Prospective Observational Study” published in the journal Nutrients in October surveyed 697 people who fasted at the Clinic Buchinger Wilhelmi on Lake Constance. Among the participants were 38 subjects with type 2 diabetes. At the beginning of the study, a fatty liver was diagnosed in 264 cases: the FLI was ≥ 60, indicating the presence of a fatty liver; 160 were at the permitted limit.

    Found here:
    https://www.buchinger-wilhelmi.com/en/wissenschaft/

    Might be interesting as well:

    Another study on the effects of fasting on the FLI(Fatty Liver Index) in summary:

    The pathological accumulation of fat in the liver and is a major cause of a worldwide increase in chronic liver disease and can lead to cirrhosis. Periodic fasting over 8.5 days on average lowers the fatty liver index (FLI), a risk parameter for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A fatty liver significantly promotes the development of type 2 diabetes and is exacerbated by overeating and lack of exercise.
    A study entitled “Effects of Periodic Fasting on Fatty Liver Index – A Prospective Observational Study” published in the journal Nutrients in October surveyed 697 people who fasted at the Clinic Buchinger Wilhelmi on Lake Constance. Among the participants were 38 subjects with type 2 diabetes. At the beginning of the study, a fatty liver was diagnosed in 264 cases: the FLI was ≥ 60, indicating the presence of a fatty liver; 160 were at the permitted limit.

    Found here:
    https://www.buchinger-wilhelmi.com/en/wissenschaft/

    That was interesting. I have never fasted that long – the graphs suggest weeks although the summary indicates 8.5 days works. My usual is two to three days of a more rigorous fast than theirs. It would be interesting to know if successive shorter complete fasts can have the same effect as the sustained low-cal regime.

    Science underway – keep 5:2ing!

    People in coronavirus quarantine are comfort eating and this has nutritionists worried about obesity levels

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-12/coronavirus-lockdown-risk-to-australian-growing-obesity-levels/12139292

    ‘For millions of women around the world, ‘that time of the month’ can signal physical and emotional mayhem as they experience the pain and discomfort commonly associated with a menstrual disorder.

    From fatigue to headaches and migraines, PMS to painful cramps and bloating, the impact of menstruation on your body can be extremely disturbing.

    But are these health concerns signs of what is going on in the body as we go through our regular cycle of fertility, or are they symptoms of a nutritional deficiency that we may be able to curb with food or supplements?’

    https://www.sbs.com.au/food/health/explainer/what-eat-when-youve-got-your-period

Viewing 50 posts - 951 through 1,000 (of 1,018 total)

You must be logged in to reply.