How Do You Reward Yourself?

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  • I thought this might be a fun topic. In addition to my body rewarding itself with better health, better posture and more positive moods, I’ve been thinking of small acts of kindness I can do to keep myself motivated.

    1. I reward myself by buying new jeans as my size drops. I’ve noticed that when I don’t wear baggy clothes I feel better.

    2. I love having a clean car to get into, so I either make time to vacuum it and wipe it down and clean the windows (of crazy amounts of dog slobber), or treat myself to a full-service car wash.

    I’m always looking for new ideas so please share…How do you reward yourself for sticking to this WOE?

    I just started fasting this week but I am a professional dieter!! My favorite thing to do to reward myself is to get a massage or get my hair done. Nothing better than being kind to yourself.

    New skinny jeans.

    @ynottoday, I love the idea of a massage or getting a new ‘do. πŸ™‚ Feeling more pulled-together really helps me. I had a pedicure yesterday in the hope that spring is actually going to come.

    @califdreamer, good for you! I admit that I just ordered a pair of my favorite skinny jeans in the next size down in anticipation of more pounds lost. And I’m not saving my “fat pants” either, they go into the thrift shop pile immediately. πŸ™‚ That way when they are gone, it’s as if they never existed.

    Onlyhermes,

    You are clearly deranged! You reward yourself for fasting by cleaning your car?!!

    No dog slobber in mine, but there is some chicken poo on the upholstery from last year. If you’re in need or extra β€˜reward’ at any time, feel free to come round and do mine πŸ˜€

    @happynow, Lololol! Dog slobber, chicken poo–clearly we’re living the dream. πŸ™‚ It reminds me of the book “The Bucolic Plague: How Two Manhattanites Became Gentleman Farmers” by Josh Kilmer-Purcell. There is an anecdote about driving a baby goat to the Martha Stewart show in the back seat of his car. I made the mistake of reading the book on an airplane. I laughed so hard I had tears streaming down my face and my row-mates probably thought I’d lost my mind.

    I have other weird rewards too, like buying new boxwood shrubs for my garden. πŸ™‚

    Onlyhermes,

    The garden plants I can understand. Cleaning, still no πŸ˜€

    I transport hens in cat boxes, and learnt my lesson the hard way that the moulded plastic carriers are better than the open mesh carriers….

    A few years ago I had an interesting four hour journey with three hens in a large cardboard box. At hour three I began to gag on the β€˜aroma’…!

    The mind boggles about travelling with a goat!

    Second the car cleaning- it is satisfying when it’s done, but definitely not a treat!! Although I do try to keep busy on FDs!
    I think this is a brilliant thread from someone who until recently always equated treats with food! So recently I have bought new clothes, new underwear, some very luxurious (although still on a bit of a budget!!) body cream, & some nice hair mask products.

    Cleaning the car is something I pay others to do as they do a far better job than me πŸ˜†

    I’ve had to replace my whole wardrobe as everything was falling off.

    I used to loathe clothes shopping as nothing I liked looked nice, and that was if there was a size large enough to fit. I now love going out and trying clothes on.
    I hadn’t worn jeans for many years and the first time I ventured into a shop and tried a pair of skinny jeans on I guessed what size I needed and had to ask the assistant to fetch a smaller size. I was so happy πŸ˜€

    Having said that, the biggest reward is the confidence I now have. I used to hide at the back of group photos and decline offers to have photos of me taken but no longer, and I’ve lost my aversion to full length mirrors.
    I also joined a gym and am happy to be seen in public in sports gear or my swimming costume.

    Above all the rewards from others ie family and friends, that come in the form of compliments never fail to lift my spirits and inspire me never to allow myself to become obese again.

    I have loved reading through. Amazon, you sound so happy and positive, as do all of you. I am in dire need of going through my clothes some of which are vintage now! Carry on my friends, I am right with you!!

    Everything I’ve been doing since suffering a debilitating adverse reaction to a statin drug in 2016 has been focused on, first, survival (it nearly killed me by triggering premature ventricular contractions), and then recovery of the gift of simple motion. It’s required such hard work — more than I ever thought I was capable of. πŸ™‚ But I’ve done it! I’ve graduated from being virtually bed/chair bound 24/7 & needing a wheelchair, to needing a rollator, to a cane, and then I began walking solo late last year. Soon after that, I joined a water aerobics class for a heck of a workout three times a week. The prolonged immobilization from the devastating muscular weakness that the #$%! statin created makes every single step I take is a huge victory, a huge gift, now. Then I was delighted to discover early this year that I could help my muscles/mitochondria/body heal through a dramatically changed diet and I successfully eliminated refined sugars and wheat from my life. It was no small feat, so when my birthday rolled around last month, I was determined to reward myself for two solid years of hard and fruitful work. So I bought myself two things: a bottle of favorite perfume and..a kite! A big, beautiful kite!, that I’m putting together and hanging in my living room. It’s been decades since I’ve flown one and although I have not recovered enough to actually run and loft it, THAT is my next goal. And now I have my kite as incentive and at the ready for the day when I CAN run again. πŸ™‚

    Wow Robin, what a journey. Well done for not giving up- shame doctors can’t read your story before being so free with statins! I hope that you can carry on fighting & improving, & that it’s not too long before you fly that kite! πŸ™‚

    Thanks hedgehogs, I will remember your encouragement! Agree about the docs. Those who prescribe statins and claim the drug cannot kill or catastrophically debilitate their patients are ignorant and dangerous.

    Such marvelous ideas– @Robin55–a kite, that is brilliant. Perfume, luxurious body creams, new lingerie, haircare, beautiful clothes! You are all such great inspiration. There’s a whole other world of pleasures out there besides food rewards, gee, who knew? πŸ™‚ @amazon, I can relate to photo aversion. It occurred to me that if something were to happen to me, there would be pretty much no photographic evidence of my existence for the past 15 years. Congratulations on getting into those photos now. I hope everyone will keep the great ideas coming!

    Robin- GP has just tried to put my hubby on statins- he’s being referred for more tests for possible cardiac problems, his cholesterol is only 4! He refused, but it’s going to be an ongoing battle, I think… we know of others with less severe problems than yours, but it’s still caused pretty nasty side effects- my Dad can hardly walk now. Keep thinking of your kite!

    Hi hedgehogs — Good for your husband! He might want to give his GP a copy of The New Adkins for a New You, and point him/her to Chapters 13 onward (and the included 100+ references) where Doctors Phinney, Vokek & Westman provide info that will help inform and educate other medical professionals. I think we patients need to help our doctors understand that there are indeed other ways to successfully manage our cholesterol and cardiovascular risks than those damned dangerous and costly drugs. Sending wishes of good results on your hubby’s tests! (It’s SO hard to wait for test results!) Is your Dad still taking a statin? Oh yeah!…I’m flying that kite every day in my dreams!! πŸ™‚

    Um, Volek, not Vokek. πŸ™‚

    Thanks for that! Saw a reference to a study finding that there’s a massive increase in risk of developing motor neurone disease as well… Yes, sadly my Dad decided to stay on them, even though he’s not able to walk far at all because of leg muscle weakness. The docs scared him into going back on them, even though he noticed improvements when he stopped them…
    Sorry OnlyHermes for hijacking your thread!
    But I did treat myself to a trying on old clothes fest this afternoon, & I have virtually a whole ‘new’ wardrobe of my favourite things I can get back into again!

    Hi Hedge, no worries, after the first post the thread belongs to everyone! Plus, I find all of the conversations fascinating and helpful. Congratulations on your “new” wardrobe. I am so looking forward to getting into clothes I have not been able to wear in years. It must feel amazing! πŸ™‚ Yay you!

    On rewards, I am down 2.5 pounds after fasting yesterday and today I’m expecting delivery of a new pair of earrings. This is a whole new world for me because previously any reward for any accomplishment (if I bothered to reward myself at all) would have been something sweet and sugary like candy or cake. Now I have things to look forward to besides eating, and I’ve even made a rewards list that I can choose from when I want to do something nice for myself. It doesn’t always involve spending money, sometimes it is a long, hot bath with an interior design magazine, sometimes it is stopping by to see a friend.

    Hey, congrats on that -2.5, onlyhermes! It’s so much fun to envision these rewards, nothing like the weird head games we have to play with ourselves when we “reward” ourselves with food that we know is actually hurting us, killing us, and making us miserable in our bodies. Really, how weird is that?!

    And I can hardly wait to do what you’re doing, hedgehogs, the old clothes fest! More fun! As for your Dad, I am so sorry he’s been scared back onto statins and is in pain, but we have to respect a person’s right to choose their own poison. I just hope his adverse reaction remains, though painful, still (relatively) mild. Maybe your own example will, over time, be the thing that will convince him that there are other, more successful and safer, ways to manage cholesterol issues.

    THanks Robin!
    Onlyhermes- well done you!
    Even after being on this WOL for 8 months, & now keto for a month, I still have the instant thought of ‘must have a donut or chocolate’ at any stressful times, or any good times to celebrate! It used to be wine, but can’t drink with the medication I’m on, so the chocolate fix started after that… hopefully one day that’ll disappear!

    @robin55, you are so right! I find I’m congratulating myself much more these days. Before this WOE my days were usually hopeful (first thing in the morning) followed by discouraged (when I inevitably got hungry and had cake for breakfast), sick (when I continued the binge through the day) followed by depressed, tired, and delusional (when I told myself it was okay because I’d start “tomorrow.”)

    @hedgehogs, I completely agree and have the same feelings. I seem to be dealing with them better now, and yes, I too hope they’ll soon become a thing of the past. My binge way of dealing with stress has become a habit, and I’ll have to replace the old habits with new habits. They say that awareness is the beginning of change and now I’m aware. So when those panicky feelings come up and I want to eliminate them by binging, I’m now beginning to be able to calm down. I’m going to try being gentle with myself when I’m stressed, recognize that I’m stressed and instead of trying to “flee” the stress by eating, do something nice for myself. I need to add some things to my rewards list that might specifically apply when I’m stressed. As in, what nice things can I do for myself to calm down?

    My earrings came yesterday, and I’m now inspired to get a new shorter hair cut. πŸ™‚

    Congratulations Onlyhermes on your loss this week!

    I had not thought consciously of rewarding myself, but I have been making trips to my closets this week to see if I can fit in my old clothes which have been abandoned for the past 5 years. Some fit and some are just a hair away from fitting well, so I was ecstatic! You all have inspired me and I’m going to make a list of rewards for myself moving forward. I’m looking forward to that muffin top disappearing when I wear my skinny jeans and those rewards will help me stay focused. Car cleaning will not make the list, but new clothes will πŸ™‚ Thank you for sharing your ideas and Onlyhermes for starting this thread!

    My husband has been doing this with me (3 days a week) and he has been very free with his compliments so that has helped too. Especially since friends and neighbors have been skeptical or even very negative about my fasting. I need to remember not to mention the fasting in social situation so I don’t spend too much time trying to explain or justify. But it’s hard not to because I am so pleased and excited about the results…

    @robin55, you are so right! I find I’m congratulating myself much more these days. Before this WOE my days were usually hopeful (first thing in the morning) followed by discouraged (when I inevitably got hungry and had cake for breakfast), sick (when I continued the binge through the day) followed by depressed, tired, and delusional (when I told myself it was okay because I’d start “tomorrow.”)

    @hedgehogs, I completely agree and have the same feelings. I seem to be dealing with them better now, and yes, I too hope they’ll soon become a thing of the past. My binge way of dealing with stress has become a habit, and I’ll have to replace the old habits with new habits. They say that awareness is the beginning of change and now I’m aware. So when those panicky feelings come up and I want to eliminate them by binging, I’m now beginning to be able to calm down. I’m going to try being gentle with myself when I’m stressed, recognize that I’m stressed and instead of trying to “flee” the stress by eating, do something nice for myself. I need to add some things to my rewards list that might specifically apply when I’m stressed. As in, what nice things can I do for myself to calm down?

    @emma1202, Hi, Yes, I can relate about about talking about it. If people ask what I’m doing I just say “I’ve changed the way I’m eating. If you want info, I’ll text you the website so we don’t bore everyone to death talking about it.” Or, “so you can read about how it works.” I don’t want to drone on or get into a debate. For that reason Dr. Fung says pretty much, don’t even bother telling anyone you’re fasting because you’ll get frustrated or discouraged. I’m always surprised, but apparently not everyone wants us to succeed. πŸ™‚ Congratulations on being close to getting into your favorite clothes!

    My earrings came yesterday, and I’m now inspired to get a new shorter hair cut. πŸ™‚

    Onlyhermes “My earrings came yesterday, and I’m now inspired to get a new shorter hair cut. πŸ™‚”

    This is great. You know how the reward areas of our brains light up with activity and grow when (we former) sugar addicts eat refined carbs? Now I can just imagine the new synapses forming and firing in the parts of our brains where the reward areas for, instead, our new earrings & hairstyles are located!

    @robin55, I hope so! πŸ™‚ This is a whole new mindset–this, taking care of myself stuff. Lol! And it hasn’t diminished in any way my ability to take care of my friends and family at the same time. In fact, I’ve found that the better job I do taking care of me, the more I have to give to others. Who knew? πŸ™‚

    You know, Onlyhermes, I think once we come to grips with the lie we’ve been living, disposed of that deceitful game we’ve been playing with ourselves about what a “reward” is, it opens the door to other thoughts and behaviors that similarly help us live more “genuine” lives. We have more of that good energy for others you describe because we aren’t consuming it 24/7 with the task of trying to stuff a nasty lie (“this refined sugar is a legitimate reward for me”) down our own throats. I do know that the longer I live with this new way of eating the less CONFLICTED I feel in general. Huh, waddya know? — Low Carb Psychology 101. πŸ™‚

    I am going to buy a big bar of chocolate when i reach my first target,When i gave up smoking i used to buy things like a watch or sport shirts.So something i am missing will do for now.

    It’s so funny how we are all different. For me, since I’m trying to separate the concept of reward and food, I have to reward myself with experiences that make me feel that my new focus on my health is paying off. Something like a social outing where I wear a pair of jeans I have not been able to wear for ages or a brand new dress is more likely to keep me motivated and it feels more like a celebration. If I gave myself food to celebrate, I would end up feeling down about 10 minutes after the taste of chocolate disappeared from my mouth. And knowing me, I would be back for more chocolate within an hour. I so admire people who can behave reasonably after eating chocolate, but I’m missing that gene for sure.

    I think it makes sense @onlyhermes that you can take even better care of others when you are good to yourself. You are less likely to be depleted when you take good care of you. I certainly feel that way about my kids. I’m more patient, more gentle, and more giving with them when I’m not on empty emotionally. I think that we are meant to be givers and care takers, but not at the detriment of ourselves. Charity starts at home is not a selfish concept to me. I think it’s a healthy concept that can leads us to give even more to other because we come from a healthy place.

    Hi Brads27 — Like Emma1202, I would dearly like to dissociate my food from my reward (and I find changing that default mindset a real challenge). But I believe that if you’re able to stick with a particular healthy way of eating long enough to successfully meet the goal you’ve set, that’s huge!, and the discipline required for that deserves the reward that YOU want most. So, a big chocolate bar? Oh, yeah!, whatever rocks your boat! The right reward could tide you over until you meet the NEXT goal you’ve set for yourself. BTW, how long have you been tobacco free? I just quit November 2017 and I’m loving not having THAT cranky & costly monkey on my back.

    I reward myself by playing FarmVille. As a computer programmer, I spend a lot of time on computers. I also love computers. My job is demanding, though, and takes me away from the things I really want to do on my computer. I love FarmVille. I know there are better games, but FarmVille just got me hooked ever since I first played it. I just wanted to keep coming back to see what happened to my crops lol

    Now, I make time for FarmVille by using it as a reward for my fasting. It makes me more likely to fast because I know I will be rewarded with something I really want.

    I love everyone’s rewards! Here are a few more I’ve written down:

    -Plan a weekend getaway to a spa or sunny place to sit on a beach or by a pool and relax.
    -Start a charm bracelet, and buy a new charm when you’ve reached a milestone.
    -Collect thin gold or silver bangles and add a new one with each goal reached. This also works well with add-a-beads.
    -Treat a friend to lunch and a matinee.
    -Give away old, uncomfortable shoes and find a new pair that doesn’t give you blisters. πŸ™‚
    -Have your sheets washed and pressed.
    -Buy a few hours of maid service for cleaning or washing and pressing.
    -Visit the garden center and make up a pot of flowers.
    -Keep fresh flowers on your desk.
    -Schedule a teeth whitening treatment.
    -Hair cut and color or gloss treatment.
    -Take your dog to a new park and go for a walk.
    -Have your house windows washed and let the sun shine in!
    -Take a long bubble bath with a stack of new magazines that you don’t normally buy.
    -Have your floors waxed and enjoy the gleaming wood.
    -Have your car professionally detailed.
    -Have a wardrobe or image consultation.
    -Have a makeover.
    -Choose a new seasonal lipstick or perfume.

    Keep the ideas coming! πŸ™‚

    @luciabronson, I never considered playing a computer game for a reward, what a great idea. That is a great idea to save that for a fast day so you look forward to it. I should do that too–save some fun things for only fast days. I think I’ll start scheduling my monthly haircuts, manicure and pedicure for fast days. I always feel better when I leave the salon afterwards.

    @brads27, yum! Can you do that without setting off a huge craving? I can see the wisdom of taking a day “off” after reaching a big goal. I so rarely eat sugar now, it makes sense to save it as a once or twice a year thing. Many years ago I did the diet where you eat low carb all week, but then whatever you want once or twice a week for a two-hour window. Weirdly, I would often have a big whoosh after the crazy carb day.

    @emma1202, those are wise words!

    This is a really inspiring thread. I struggle as food, I love it, few things in life give me as much pleasure as food does. It’s almost been a spiritual journey eliminating it even for short periods. I sometimes reward myself with chocolate I know that’s not optimal but finding non food rewards is a challenge.

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